RESOURCES OF THE MATHS ANXIETY TRUST

Maths Anxiety book cover and back page

COMING SHORTLY

Contents include:
WHY DOES A CHILD NEED TO LEARN MATHS?
WHAT IS MATHS ANXIETY?
WHY DOES MATHS ANXIETY HAPPEN?
HOW AND WHEN DOES MATHS ANXIETY START?
CAN MATHS ANXIETY BE PREVENTED?
CAN MATHS ANXIETY BE TREATED?
WHAT CAN BE DONE TO STOP MATHS ANXIETY?
…And plenty more…

REPORT: THE FEAR FACTOR

Maths Action Report: The Fear Factor

Download the booklet: The Fear Factor: Maths Anxiety in girls and women, by Samantha Callan, a report commissioned by The Maths Anxiety Trust.

This Report looks at attitudes to maths and why Maths Anxiety continues to prevail among women and girls.

Mathematics – maths – is a social justice issue: around one in five adults in the UK lack even basic numeracy skills without which they find it difficult to budget and make money stretch as far as possible; they feel stressed and insecure about moneyregardless of their income, and they struggle to overcome barriers to progression in work.

Yet senior educationalists agree that it is culturally acceptable, especially for women, to say, ‘I hate maths, I was never any good with numbers’.

As well as awareness that the relationship between females and maths is typically not a happy one, there is also a growing sense that something needs to be done about it. Even though girls outperform boys at school overall, closer inspection reveals they lag behind when it comes to this indispensible subject. There is a deep-seated and widespread belief that boys are born with an ability to do maths, whereas girls are not.

Mathematics – maths – is a social justice issue: around one in five adults in the UK lack even basic numeracy skills without which they find it difficult to budget and make money stretch as far as possible; they feel stressed and insecure about moneyregardless of their income, and they struggle to overcome barriers to progression in work. Yet senior educationalists agree that it is culturally acceptable, especially for women, to say, ‘I hate maths, I was never any good with numbers’.

As well as awareness that the relationship between females and maths is typically not a happy one, there is also a growing sense that something needs to be done about it. Even though girls outperform boys at school overall, closer inspection reveals they lag behind when it comes to this indispensible subject. There is a deep-seated and widespread belief that boys are born with an ability to do maths, whereas girls are not.

Yet there is no biological reason or evidence from research to support this belief.

The Maths Myth, which drives the fear factor for many women and girls, needs to be publicly identified as a remaining injustice of patriarchy; then it needs to be demolished.

Rt Hon Nicky Morgan MP Rt Hon Nicky Morgan MP, former Secretary of State for Education and Minister for Women and Equalities

When I was both Secretary of State for Education and Minister for Women and Equalities, I was determined to ensure that there are no barriers to women taking part in and succeeding in STEM subjects and careers. When girls with the potential to succeed in maths and the sciences at school are deterred from pursuing them, it’s not just those young women who lose out, but the entire country’s international competitiveness.

This Report is a welcome contribution to the debate on how to tackle maths misconceptions with clear recommendations on how all aspects of society can play their part in doing so.

Prof Gary CooperProfessor Sir Cary Cooper, CBE, The 50th Anniversary Professor of Organizational Psychology and Health at Manchester Business School, University of Manchester& Co-Editor of Women in Management (Volumes 1 & 2)

The Report The Fear Factor makes a major contribution to breaking the ‘Maths Myth’ that girls and women are less competent than boys and men in maths. As a father of three girls, I have seen this stereotype in action, and how it can inhibit educational choices. Maths and statistics are an integral part of many aspects of life and the sooner we get rid of this myth the better, so girls and women can make life decisions without the ‘Fear Factor’.

I strongly support this report, knowing it will make a significant difference to educational policy and practice.

WHAT IS MATHS ANXIETY?

A 2 minute film asks university-age students.

COMING SHORTLY

FILM OF THE SUMMIT CONFERENCE ON MATHS ANXIETY, held on Wednesday, 13th June 2018 at UCL, London University.

 

Maths Action Report: What's It Got To Do With Me?

REPORT: WHAT’S IT GOT TO DO WITH ME?

Download the booklet: What’s It Got To Do With Me? Primary research into attitudes to maths of Year 9 (13–14 year olds) and Year 12 (16–17 year olds), by Diane Carrington, M.Sc. Psych. PGCE, a survey commissioned by The Maths Anxiety Trust.

This Report shows why girls do not continue to study maths after GCSE level, and consequently fail to pursue careers in maths related areas.The most recent statistics show us that in 2014, of the A level papers taken by girls only 8.5% were in Maths A Level or Further Maths A Level, compared to 16.9% of boys (Joint Council for Qualifications ‘Cumulative percentages of Subject Results by Grade and by Gender’. 2014).

Considering the crucial need for maths in order to succeed in every-day life as well as in all workplaces, it is clear how this disadvantages women in their life.

However, as Elizabeth Truss, when Minister for Education and Child Care, said:

“Getting girls to take an interest in maths and science isn’t just about improving their earnings potential, as it’s also about improving the country’s economic and educational performance.” (The Guardian, 8th December 2014, ‘A gender gap that simply doesn’t add up’)

One can easily see the evidence of this loss of creativity and talent, for example in the fact that only 6% of the engineering workforce in the UK is female. (Women in Engineering Statistics 2014, from Royal Academy of Engineering analysis of the Labour Force Survey, 2004–2010, quoted in Diversity data, RAEng, 20)

The present study was designed to focus on one girls’ secondary academy and to investigate why, even though at GCSE 90% of girls gained A*–C passes in maths, only 22% chose to study maths in Year 12.


Want to be a model? A singer? A fashion designer? A vet? The importance of maths to every job a girl wants to get. Watch AMBITION: A 3 MINUTE FILM


Want to know what other girls find tough about maths? A MATHS WORKSHOP FOR YEAR 9 GIRLS: A 9 MINUTE FILM


Based on the BBC Question Time format, Langley Park School for Girls hosts an evening for Year 9 girls and their parents to discuss the role, importance of and attitudes to maths in ordinary life and work.

MONEY STUFF

Want to know how to split a pizza bill? Want to understand mobile phone offers and fuel tariffs?

MONEY STUFF is a FREE interactive ebook for iPad. It is a do-it-by-yourself, 4-step maths course for Real Life. It connects maths to Real life.

Want to be famous? You’ll need to work out your royalties, check that people aren’t ripping you off… Want to run a restaurant? You’ll need numbers for recipe quantities, you’ll need to understand profit margins, so you know how much to charge. MONEY STUFF relates maths to real ambitions.

MONEY STUFF can be used as a starter or as a refresher, a complete maths course for anyone that follows the GCSE syllabus. Successfully tested over two years in school, university and by working women, MONEY STUFF gets good feedback from students, teachers, educational professionals.

Shirley Conran has brought maths alive and made it relevant. This will be a must-have book for everyone who wants to make a success of life.’ Caroline Shott, CEO, The Learning Skills Foundation